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Brad Fitzpatrick

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Misc [Dec. 14th, 2001|12:05 pm]
Brad Fitzpatrick
[Tags|]

Ich habe vergessen, zu sagen, dass heute das Wetter ganz wunderbar ist!

I lovelovelove German sentence construction. It makes to me Fun. hehehe.

(I have forgotten, to say, that today the weather totally wonderful is.)

But it is.... the weather's soooo nice today. I think I'll go run.

I mailed my German teacher just a bit ago:
Tag!

Haben Sie das Email meines Klassenkameradin Marlana? Gestern habe ich vergessen, Deutsch mit ihr zu lernen. Ich habe ein Email aber es ist falsch. Wenn ich es benutze, kontaktiere ich der falschen Mensch.

Danke,
Brad
I'm not sure if it's correct, but I used the genitive case and an adjective ending. HooRAY.

Nope, I did screw it up. Corrected:
Tag!

Haben Sie die Emailadresse meiner Klassenkameradin Marlana? Gestern habe ich vergessen, Deutsch mit ihr zu lernen. Ich habe eine Emailadresse aber sie ist falsch. Wenn ich sie benutze, kontaktiere ich den falschen Menschen.

Danke,
Brad
Props to my e-german teacher, calliste. :P

"das Email" is "enamel". "die E-Mail" is email, but not an address.
LinkReply

Comments:
[User Picture]From: calliste
2001-12-14 12:06 pm (UTC)
Hier ist es dafr ganz, ganz kalt (-10C)... aber sonst ist das Wetter auch ok.
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[User Picture]From: calliste
2001-12-14 12:20 pm (UTC)
Yeah, I think about every German in the whole wide world misspells email. I use about three versions of the word just to be sure I get the right one every now and then.
(Reply) (Thread)
From: evan
2001-12-14 10:00 pm (UTC)
Heh, I saw that masculine genetive ending with the feminine Klassenkameradin and cringed. :P
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[User Picture]From: brad
2001-12-14 10:19 pm (UTC)
Admittedly, I'm very new to the genitive case. I will strive to improve with aim to lower your necessary cringage.

I like how that word has "kamerad" in it. German/Russian/English all have that lexeme(?). So neat. I want to take one of those Linguistics classes where they discuss which languages descend from what.

Like how in English we have: dog (??), hound (German), canine (Latin).


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[User Picture]From: calliste
2001-12-15 07:17 am (UTC)
Hee hee... I had one of those linguistics classes *grin*. It was awesome. ;)

There are tons of words to describe stuff in English, but most of it is very specialised or has a certain style level. I like the words where you can actually see the German in it, sort of. Like e.g. hound (but the meaning is really narrowed isn't it) or fowl, which you only use in combinations with waterfowl and that I think, and it's only birds that you can hunt slash eat, right? I'm not too sure. In German it's Vogel. As you probably know. That connection almost slaps you in the face :) Fun similarity: bird - Brut. Brut referring to the eggs and young birds in the nest. The word used to be really similar in English (brydde, or something) and the whole meaning was generalized to just meaning "bird". Strange! Languages rock.
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From: evan
2002-07-16 01:36 pm (UTC)
I'm deleting old comments, and I saw this one again, and it's sorta funny because I no longer immediately see the problem in your German. It's a shame how soon we forget it.

I have an essay here in my Verbatim (magazine about words) that discusses how we use Latin words in places where the Germanic/?? words sound strange. It begins by trying to describe the landscape of the moon-- "moonish"? "moonlike"? "moonic"?-- so we switch back to "lunar". It has a bunch more examples like that... pretty neat.
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