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Brad Fitzpatrick

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articles and presentations [Mar. 12th, 2004|12:09 pm]
Brad Fitzpatrick
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I'd agreed to write an article about memcached for LinuxJournal awhile back and forgotten. The deadline is April 9... not so bad.

Turns out there's even money involved... $600 if it makes it to print, and $150 if just on the website.

Things like this make me a little uncomfortable, though:
Once your article is submitted, it will be in the publication queue
and therefore cannot be submitted elsewhere unless 1) Linux Journal
rejects the article, or 2) the author notifies Linux Journal of
his/her intent to withdraw the article and Linux Journal agrees
to release the article. (The only circumstance under which we
will not release an article is if it has already been scheduled
for publication.)
This exclusivity worries me... can I plagarize myself (earlier articles I've written)... can I reuse content in future articles? Can I republish it myself?

I should ask if I can retain the rights to the article after 'n' days of exclusivity.

At least for the MySQL conference they mailed me and said:
Dear Speakers,

As a service to our attendees and to the MySQL community, we wish to publish the slides and scripts for your presentations on the mysql.com website.

In order to do this, we ask you to license your presentation materials under one of the Creative Commons licenses.

The Creative Commons licenses are a family of licenses designed to help spread innovation and creativity. For an excellent overview of the goals and means of the licenses and the project please visit http://creativecommons.org/learn/

We also ask that you consider licensing images from, as well as audio and video recordings of, your session under a Creative Commons license as well.

If you choose to do this, we suggest that you consider each of the content types separately. We also suggest that you consider requesting the right to review images, audio and video recordings before they are published.

For more details, please visit http://creativecommons.org/license/ - it provides you with a step-by-step guide to choosing a license.

If you have any questions on this or require assistance, please contact ......

Thanks,
Sabaina
How cool is that?

Speaking of which, I need to get working on those slides. That's coming up as well.
LinkReply

Comments:
[User Picture]From: johno
2004-03-12 12:18 pm (UTC)
The "exclusivity clause" is fairly standard.

In other words, once we've bought it, we don't want it appearing anywhere else, until we publish it.

You can negotiate what the rights are AFTER publication, but they will either not give up "First Pub" rights or want to cut the fee to reprint levels.


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