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Brad Fitzpatrick

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Diebold [Sep. 22nd, 2004|10:57 am]
Brad Fitzpatrick
All this Diebold crap depresses me so much.

Why don't the People In Charge understand that an open, peer-reviewed, understood voting system is the only safe bet? Even if Diebold isn't intentionally evil (a big if), they're definitely not smart. Do you want a corporation rushing out shoddy voting software to make a buck, or would you rather a group of smart people made it for free, motivated only by making the best system that's fair and tamper-proof?

The People in general don't much know or care ("but it's DIGITAL!"), which is a depression I've long since come to accept, but I'd expect better of our government.

Good reading: http://www.blackboxvoting.com/ (which would be better with RSS)
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Comments:
[User Picture]From: chris
2004-09-22 01:35 pm (UTC)
Call it conspiracy if you want, but when the CEO of Diebold is one of Bush's biggest campaigners, I can't help but draw some conclusions as to why a government in power might want to adopt a poorly secured, error prone, and easily manipulated voting system. Its just too obvious, especially from an administration that has already demonstrated its not afraid to muck with the electoral process already.
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[User Picture]From: brad
2004-09-22 01:45 pm (UTC)
No kidding.

I don't think anybody in politics should be able to own stock in any of these voting companies, nor do I think anybody in the voting companies should be allowed to donate money to or endorse any party or candidate.

Major conflicts of interest there. It seems like laws should already exist for this class of problem.
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[User Picture]From: xaosenkosmos
2004-09-22 03:39 pm (UTC)
It seems like laws should already exist for this class of problem.

Yeah, i'm sure we could use the laws that prevent government officials from running defense contractors, or that keep former lobbyists from taking positions within government.

Err, wait, we're fucked.

I suppose it goes back to "You can't legislate morality." I like to think that one could legislate ethical conduct for government officials, but one apparently cannot. Depressing, but true. I think a decent first-pass partial solution (read: quick kludge) is to make government employees lower than citizens somehow, to reinforce the view that they are there to serve us, not vice-versa. Unfortunately, this is simply evil, unamerican, and will never get passed into law by those who see themselves as above their fellow citizens.

"In his own mind, he who writes or enforces the law is himself above that law."
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