?

Log in

No account? Create an account
Silly Sun - brad's life — LiveJournal [entries|archive|friends|userinfo]
Brad Fitzpatrick

[ website | bradfitz.com ]
[ userinfo | livejournal userinfo ]
[ archive | journal archive ]

Silly Sun [Oct. 4th, 2004|06:25 pm]
Brad Fitzpatrick
[Tags|]

I'd really like to use Solaris 10 (for ZFS and especially DTrace), but it didn't boot up on a test machine here because the NIC wasn't recognized.

So fuck it --- I'll be a cheap-o x86 Sun box, right? Something that's on the Solaris 10 HCL.

Doot, doot, filling out the shopping cart. What OS do I want? Well, Solaris 9 I guess, since 10 isn't out yet. But I'm curious what the difference between "Solaris 9 x86 RTU license" and "Solaris 9 media kit" is.... so I click Learn More.

But look at the status bar.... "Learn more" just links to Linux info.



Nice.
LinkReply

Comments:
[User Picture]From: scosol
2004-10-04 07:18 pm (UTC)
so... buy it without an OS and install the solaris 10 preview?

that's weak though that it didn't talk to your nic- cant you just pop in eepro or something for testing?
(Reply) (Thread)
[User Picture]From: brad
2004-10-04 09:38 pm (UTC)
so... buy it without an OS and install the solaris 10 preview?

Good point. But I was kinda hoping that if I bought Solaris 9 now, I'd get 10 for free later. Unfortunately it was too late to call the sales people and ask.

that's weak though that it didn't talk to your nic- cant you just pop in eepro or something for testing?

Durrr..... yeah, I guess so. Never thought it out that much.
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)
[User Picture]From: grumpy_sysadmin
2004-10-06 03:33 pm (UTC)
They may really not have an Ethernet driver for that chipset. Cf, my earlier comments. What chipset is it?
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)
[User Picture]From: grumpy_sysadmin
2004-10-04 08:45 pm (UTC)
Ugh.

All signs point to "don't do Solaris x86", and have since... it existed.

Sure, it's cute and all, but the hardware support pain is worse than Windows, and almost as occluded.

(Solaris on Sun's hardware is the best Unix running. Too bad Sun'll be dead inside ten years.)
(Reply) (Thread)
[User Picture]From: brad
2004-10-04 09:34 pm (UTC)
I'm only going to run one for now, just to use DTrace on a few dozen things. I wish Innodb checksummed its 16k pages and had some way to communicate to the OS that a read was bogus and to use the other mirror, then I wouldn't need ZFS so much.
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)
[User Picture]From: grumpy_sysadmin
2004-10-06 03:46 pm (UTC)
Have you considered using VxFS on Linux?

It's very good about making the whole file system go away if its got read errors even on one (RAID-hardware-side) LUN making up the plex (Veritas speak, sorry), and missing file systems are a pretty easy thing to use in a decision to fail over.

Add to that that it's wicked fast and can allow all the bonuses of raw-slice access for DBs on files logically within a file system through the extra-money Quick I/O option; it comes labeled for a variety of DBs, but that's a price structure thing, as it works just fine through mechanisms other than the DB in question, judging by my own dd(1) + iostat(8m) tests under Solaris (Sparc) with the QIO for Oracle module. The functionality's very simple: you use their mkqio utility and it creates a file system node pointing to however many contiguous blocks you want (we never went over 2 GB for voodoo reasons) with a dot before the file name and a sym link without the dot that points at the dot file with a bunch of colon-separated arguments hanging off it. When anything requests a read of the sym link, the VxFS substructure reads the args and then provides effectively direct I/O seamlessly. You don't have to do anything special in the application, as I understand it: we always told Oracle it was using file system files, not raw slices.

Oh, wait, last I heard QIO didn't exist for Linux yet, which was why $FORMER_EMPLOYER didn't bother with it on Linux, but only on Solaris. Worth checking out, though, since it's only a matter of time (and calls requesting it) before Veritas caves (and IBM and Oracle are probably already beating them up about it).

There is, of course, that price detail.

(I hate Veritas NetBackup--my current primary responsibility--with a passion, but I can't say enough good things about Volume Manager. If someone at Veritas were to write a halfway-decent POSIX kernel, they'd have the killer Unix in the market overnight. They've already got everything else they need, plus the industry leverage to make Oracle et al support their OS.)
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)
[User Picture]From: grumpy_sysadmin
2004-10-06 03:48 pm (UTC)
Yeah, so I didn't really address DTrace, since I'm not totally clearly on what's so hot about it. I know that Solaris has the only worthwhile iostat and strace out there, but what's DTrace supposed to do that's so fancy?
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)
[User Picture]From: brad
2004-10-06 04:05 pm (UTC)
I wouldn't be able to do it justice, so I'd suggest you read the hype and papers.

In a nutshell, it has thousands upon thousands of /dynamic/ tracing points throughout both the kernel functions, syscall layer, and user space (automatically without recompiling), both in C and in Java, and it's a full scripting langauge that lets you write scripts to do dynamic profiling. Zero performance hit when it's off, and negligible when it's on. And designed to be perfectly safe, unless Linux's strace (ptrace is funny).

Go look at some of the DTrace script repositories... it's scary what you can do so easily. All the standard system tools (iostat, strace, etc) are a pageful at most in D, the DTrace language.
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)
[User Picture]From: gandalfgreyhame
2004-10-19 12:00 am (UTC)
I'm guessing that the RTU license is the significant thing, if you want to actually use it. The media kit just gives you a copy of the disks, in and of itself you're not allowed to use it.

Hurrah for Unix Vendors, eh?

I've been toying with Solaris 10 for x86 on one of my systems, however it's a Sun Opteron system, so it works fairly well. No accelerated drivers for the nvidia graphics card yet, though, so the GUI response lags a bit compared to Fedora Core with the nVidia binary drivers.

I believe I've mentioned it before, but the latest public Solaris 10 release (8/04) doesn't include ZFS bits.

</ramble>
(Reply) (Thread)
[User Picture]From: brad
2004-10-19 12:05 am (UTC)
I believe I've mentioned it before, but the latest public Solaris 10 release (8/04) doesn't include ZFS bits.

Oh, sad.
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)